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Some Best Bits and Bites from James Joyce's Finnegans Wake
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 5:28 am  Reply with quote
Xavier Onassis
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Why then how?

Well, almost any photoist worth his chemicots will tip anyone asking him the teaser that if a negative of a horse happens to melt enough while drying, well, what you do get is, well, a positively grotesquely distorted macromass of all sorts of horsehappy values and masses of meltwhile horse.  Tip.  Well, this freely is what must have occurred to our missive (there’s a sod of a turb for you!  please wisp off the grass!) unfilthed from the boucher by the sagacity of a lookmelittle likemelong hen.  Heated residence in the heart of the orangeflavoured mudmound had partly obliterated the negative to start with, causing some features palpably nearer your pecker to be swollen up most grossly while the farther back we manage to wiggle the more we need the loan of a lens to see as much as the hen saw.  Tip.

You is feeling like you was lost in the bush, boy?  You says: It is a puling sample jungle of woods.  You most shouts out: Bethicket me for a stump of a beech if I have the poultriest notions what the farest he all means.  Gee up, girly!  The quad gospellers may own the targum but any of the Zingari shoolerim may pick a peck of kindlings yet from the sack of auld hensyne.

Lead, kindly fowl!  They always did: ask the ages. What bird has done yesterday man may do next year, be it fly, be it moult, be it hatch, be it agreement in the nest.  For her socioscientific sense is sound as a bell, sir, her volucrine automutativness right on normalcy: she knows, she just feels she was kind of born to lay and love eggs (trust her to propagate the species and hoosh her fluffballs safe through din and danger!)
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just let it wash over you, don't try to figure it out
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:04 am Reply with quote
Xavier Onassis
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And then.  Be old.  The next thing is.  We are once amore as babes awondering in a wold made fresh where with the hen in the storyaboot we start from scratch.

(note: this next I have fiddled with by editing out some bits of what JJ actually wrote)

You mean to see we have been hadding a sound night's sleep?  You may so.  It is just, it is just about to, it is just about to rolywholyover.  Of all the stranger things that ever not even in the hundrund and badst pageans of unthowsent and wonst nice...to be have happened!  The untireties of livesliving being the one substrance of a streamsbecoming.
Totalled in toldteld and telltold in tittletell tattle.  Why?  Because, graced be Gad and all giddy gadgets, in whose words were the beginnings, there are two signs to turn to, the yest and the ist, the wright side and the wronged side, feeling aslip and wauking up, so an, so farth.  Why?  It is a sot of a swigswag, systomy dystomy, which everabody you ever anywhere at all doze.  Why?  Such me.  Where did thots come from?  It is infinitesimally fevers, resty fever, risy fever, a coranto of aria, sleeper awakening, in the smalls of one's back presentiment, ...a flash from a future of maybe mahamayability through the windr of a wondr in a wildr is a weltr as a wirbl of a warbl is a world.

Tom.
It is perfect degrees excelsius.  
....Anemone activescent the torporature is returning to mornal.  Humid nature is feeling itself freely at ease with the all fresco.
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FW isn't about a dream, it is a dream, a written hologram
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:08 am Reply with quote
Xavier Onassis
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Oh, how it was duusk!  From Vallee Maraia to Grasyaplaina, dorimust echo!  Ah dew!  Ah dew!  It was so duusk that the tears of night began to fall, first by ones and twos, then by threes and fours, at last by fives and sixes of sevens, for the tired ones were wecking, as we weep now with them.

Then Nuvoletta reflected for the last time in her little long life and she made up all her myriads of drifting minds in one.  She cancelled all her engauzements.  She climbed over the bannistars; she gave a childy cloudy cry: Nuee!  Nuee!  A lightdress fluttered.  She was gone.  And into the river that had been a stream (for a thousand of tears had gone eon her and come on her and she was stout and struck on dancing and her muddied name was Missis-liffi) there fell a tear, a singult tear, the lovliest of all tears (I mean for those crylove fables fans who are 'keen' on the pretty-pretty commonface sort of thing you meet by hopeharrods) for it was a leaptear.  But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why!  Weh, O Weh!  I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!

Soft morning, city!  Lsp!  I am leafy speafing.  Lpf!  Folty and folty all the nights have falled on to long my hair.  Not a sound, falling.  Lispin!  No wind no word.  Only a leaf, just a leaf and then leaves.
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the reader is writing the book
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:21 am Reply with quote
Xavier Onassis
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Panoptical purview of political progress reveals the future presentation of the past.

Toborrow and toburrow and tobarrow!  That's our crass, hairy, and evergrim life, till one finel howdiedow Bouncer Naster raps on the bell with a bone and his stinkers stank behind him with the sceptre and the hourglass.  We may come, touch and go, from atoms and ifs but we're presurely destined to be odd's without ends.
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How small it's all!
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:28 am Reply with quote
Xavier Onassis
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It's something fails us.  First we feel.  Then we fall.  And let her rain now if she likes.  Gently or strongly as she likes.  Anyway let her rain for my time is come.  I done me best when I was let.  Thinking always if I go all goes.  A hundred cares, a tithe of troubles and is there one who understands me?  One in a thousand years of the nights?

Illas!  I wisht I had better glances to peer to you through this baylight's growing.
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Kilt by kelt shell kithagain with kinagain.
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:46 am Reply with quote
Xavier Onassis
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Retire to rest without first misturbing your neighboor, mankind of baffling descriptions.  Others are as tired of themselves as you are.  Let each one learn to bore himself.

So an inedible yellow-meat turns out the invasable blackth.

(that last one is the sun coming up.  dawn.)
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Re: Kilt by kelt shell kithagain with kinagain.
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2012 6:19 pm Reply with quote
spamwhacker
 
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Xavier Onassis wrote:
Retire to rest without first misturbing your neighboor, mankind of baffling descriptions.  Others are as tired of themselves as you are.  Let each one learn to bore himself.

So an inedible yellow-meat turns out the invasable blackth.

(that last one is the sun coming up.  dawn.)


How the heck did I miss this?!  

This requires some adjustment of the watchworks!  
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2012 11:43 am Reply with quote
admin
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St Pats kick    

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Will work for PEACE
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 2:04 am Reply with quote
lupercalio
 
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Posts: 840



Bloomsday kick (different novel, same locale, any excuse will do) plus article from IT:

Seeing Dublin in full Bloom
The Irish Times - Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Saturday is Bloomsday, and while many of the places Joyce mentioned in ‘Ulysses’ are gone, several are still there, with alternatives for the absentees.



Episode one: Telemachus

The Martello Tower, Sandycove

Greet the morning gently with a guided tour of the Martello where Ulysses opens, and an early initiation into Bloomsday with readings by Barry McGovern and Brenda McSweeney. James Joyce Museum, Martello Tower, Sandycove; June 16th, 8am-6pm

Episode two: Nestor

The School, Summerfield, Dalkey Avenue

Dander up Dalkey Avenue to Dalkey Heritage Centre for a re-enactment of Mr Deasy’s school scene, and take a guided walk around the village afterwards.

Dalkey Heritage Centre, June 16th, 3.30pm

Episode three: Proteus

Sandymount Strand

Take the Dart towards the city, stopping off for a saunter “into eternity” amid the “seaspawn and seawrack” of Sandymount Strand. Or join the Crusaders Athletic Club for their annual charity Bloomsday Beach Run. Starting point: Sean Moore Park end of Sandymount Strand, June 21st, 7.30pm

Episode four: Calypso

The Gresham Hotel

The original breakfast took place at home at 7 Eccles Street, but there’s an opportunity to refuel with a proper Joycean breakfast in the Gresham ballroom.

Like Leopold Bloom, eat “with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls . . . thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, a stuffed roast heart, liver slices fried with crustcrumbs, fried hencod’s roes . . . grilled mutton kidneys”, which will give to your “palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine”.

The Gresham Hotel, June 16th, 9am and 11am

Episode five: Lotus Eaters

Sweny’s Pharmacy

Pop into “freckle faced” Sweny’s on Lincoln Place for an impromptu reading and to pick up your tickets for its musical extravaganza at the Mont Clare Hotel. Take tea in the Lincoln Inn, formerly Finn’s Hotel, where Joyce met Nora Barnacle for the first time on June 16th, 1904.

Events daily at Sweny’s, June 12th-16th; Sweny’s Does Bloomsnight, Mont Clare Hotel, June 16th, 7pm

Episode six: Hades

Glasnevin Cemetery

Join the cortege to Glasnevin Cemetery for Paddy Dignam’s funeral. Listen in to a rehearsed reading from Hades by the Dublin Shakespeare Performance Group, and while you are at it, stick around for a Joycean tour with Shane Mac Thomáis.

Glasnevin Cemetery, June 16th. Reading: 12pm. Tour: 1.30pm

Episode seven: Aeolus

‘Freeman’s Journal’/‘Evening Telegraph’ office, Prince’s Street

Bloom worked here, selling adverts. The paper is long gone, of course, but in his honour you could stroll on to O’Connell Street and buy a newspaper from the newspaper vendors there. The Irish Times, of course.

Episode eight: Laestrygonians

Davy Byrne’s Pub

Leech about Davy Byrne’s “moral bar”, Duke Street, at lunchtime for “stripes of sandwich, fresh clean bread, with relish of disgust, pungent mustard, the feety savour of green cheese”; or you could just settle for a gorgonzola sandwich.

Episode nine: Scylla and Charybdis

National Library

Read episode nine in the National Library, Kildare Street, where Joyce imagined himself out of Dublin.

Alternatively, take a jaunt out to Dún Laoghaire and watch Rough Magic Theatre Company bring Stephen’s analysis of Shakespeare to life in Conor Hanratty’s adaptation of Scylla and Charybdis, part of a week-long series of events celebrating Joyce.

Bloomsday events at the National Library run from 2pm-6pm. ‘Scylla and Charybdis’ is at the Pavilion Theatre, Dún Laoghaire, June 13th, 1pm

Episode 10: Wandering Rocks

North Great George’s Street

Follow in Bloom’s footsteps and join an official walking tour through the “odour of ashpits and old weeds and offal” that is Joyce’s Dublin.

Starting off at the James Joyce Museum on North Great George’s Street, take the Wandering Rocks odyssey through the book’s north Dublin sites.

James Joyce Centre, June 12th-16th

Episode 11: Sirens

Usher’s Quay

The Ormond Hotel of the book is long gone, but pop across the quay to Usher’s Island, where Joyce’s famous story The Dead was set, for an audio tour of the building produced by Wonderland Productions.

15 Usher’s Island, June 14th, 2pm

Episode 12: Cyclops

Bailey Pub, Duke Street

Barney Kiernan’s pub on Arbour Hill no longer exists so head to the Bailey pub on Duke Street for a refreshment instead to see prints from Rob Berry’s Ulysses “Seen”, a dramatic graphic novel adaptation of Joyce’s novel.

The Bailey, until June 16th

Episode 13: Nausicaa

Sandymount Strand

Bloom is back in Sandymount again, ogling Gerty MacDowell’s “neat blouse of electric blue . . . navy threequarter skirt . . . [and] coquettish little love of a hat of wideleaved nigger straw contrast trimmed with an underbrim of eggblue chenille and at the side a butterfly bow of silk to tone”.

Celebrate Bloomsday in an elaborate costume of your own: try a local charity shop, the Fancy Dress Store in Blackrock or Abbey Theatre Costume Hire.

Episode 14: Oxen of the Sun

Holles Street Hospital

Bloom visits Mina Purefoy as she labours at Holles Street Hospital, in one of Ulysses’s most challenging episodes, where wordplay replaces real language.

Try standing outside and proclaiming “In ward wary the watcher hearing come that man mild-hearted eft rising with swire ywimpled to him her gate wide undid” for size.

Episode 15: Circe

Nighttown, James Joyce Street

Episode 15 is devised as a surreal play script, complete with stage directions. The setting is The Monto, Nighttown, Dublin’s red-light district in 1904. Today one of the streets in the area is named after the author.

Episode 16: Eumaeus

Butt Bridge

Well in their cups at a late hour, Bloom and Stephen bond over song at the cabman’s shelter on Butt Bridge.

The bridge, of course, is still there, but for music join NUI Galway’s Prof Fran O’Rourke and classical guitarist John Feeley at Joyce’s alma mater for “an old German song of Johannes Jeep about the clear sea and the voices of sirens, sweet murderers of men”. See the panel opposite for more details on these events.

Newman House, until June 15th, 1pm

Episode 17: Ithaca

The James Joyce Centre

Bloom arrives home to No 7 Eccles Street. As it happens, that part of the street has been transported to the James Joyce Centre on North Great George’s Street, which has the original door on display in the museum.

Knock in throughout the Bloomsday Festival and see a mock-up of the rooms in Trieste, Zurich and Paris where he wrote most of Ulysses.

Ongoing, James Joyce Centre

Episode 18: Penelope

Bewley’s, Grafton Street

Say yes! Eight great sentences over 50 pages bring us deep into the mind of Bloom’s wife, Molly, for the concluding episode of Joyce’s odyssey. Watch Eilin O’Dea perform her famous soliloquy in an intimate cabaret setting.

Bewley’s Cafe Theatre, until June 14th, 8pm

Quote:
A record-breaking reading

MORE THAN 100 Irish writers will read consecutively for 28 hours this weekend in an attempt to break the world record for the most authors reading one after another at an event to mark Bloomsday at the Irish Writers’ Centre.


Senator David Norris will open proceedings at 10am on Friday, before 111 poets, novelists, playwrights and short-story writers will take to the stage to read for 15 minutes from their own works through the day and night.

The event will kick off with John Boyne, who will read from his latest novel The Absolutist, and end with a reading by Jack Harte from his short-story collection From Under Gogols Nose at 1.45pm on Bloomsday, Saturday June 16th.

“Bloomsday is special this year in that Joyce’s works have come out of copyright, and there will be a lot of Joycean events using his texts,” says Jack Harte, chairman of the Irish Writers’ Centre. “We thought this would be an appropriate but different tribute to the day.”

Seamus Heaney, Kevin Barry, Gabriel Rosenstock, Dermot Bolger, Marita Conlon McKenna, Gerald Dawe and Roddy Doyle are among those who will take part. “For the authors who are not household names, it is a chance to promote their work and read to a willing audience,” says Harte. “We try to celebrate the achievements of the great writers past and present, and use that to give a leg-up to new writers who are on the way up.”

The current record for consecutive readings is held by 75 authors who read at the Berlin International Literature Festival in 2010.

The Bloomsday event will be open to the public and streamed live on the Irish Writers’ Centre website. A full schedule is available at Writerscentre.ie. CIARA KENNY
.............................................
Hear Joyce’s guitar in concert

The strings of James Joyce’s guitar are making “music sweet” again this week for the first time in many years. This is, in fact, the first time that the guitar has been played in public.

Last March, the guitar, which has been in the museum at the Joyce Tower in Sandycove since the 1960s, was restored and made playable again by luthier Gary Southwell. Joyce owned and played the guitar while in Zurich during the first World War, and there is a famous photograph of him playing it.

The person who sponsored the restoration, UCD academic Prof Fran O’Rourke, who is also a singer and musician, is now presenting a week-long series of recitals in which he is accompanied on the guitar by leading Irish guitarist John Feeley. O’Rourke and Feeley are performing Irish songs linked to Joyce. They also perform a song that Joyce is known to have sung while accompanying himself on the guitar. Un Rêve, which is not thought to have been performed before in Ireland, is sung in both French and Greek; Prof O’Rourke has managed to track down both versions.

The recitals take place in Newman House, 86 St Stephen’s Green, each day until Friday, from 1pm to 1.55pm. TERENCE KILLEEN


http://www.irishtimes.com/newspap...ures/2012/0612/1224317743796.html

_________________
"And that is the most important topic on earth: peace. . . . Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. . . . [but] genuine peace." -- John F. Kennedy, American University Commencement,  Washington DC, June 10 , 1963
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:48 am Reply with quote
lupercalio
 
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another kick for Bloomsday tomorrow and unspecified particulars today!  

   

_________________
"And that is the most important topic on earth: peace. . . . Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. . . . [but] genuine peace." -- John F. Kennedy, American University Commencement,  Washington DC, June 10 , 1963
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How glad you'll be I waked you!
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 2:08 am Reply with quote
Xavier Onassis
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I will tell you all sorts of makeup things, strangerous.  And show you to every simple storyplace we pass.  FW p625

I have JJ on cassette tape reading a couple of his own bits from FW.  Believe I'll treat myself to another listen today while i (hopefully) watch some rain pour down on the lawns and gardens of me own wee estate.

Mebbe drink a toast to Parnell this afternoon, for good measure.  
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 11:21 am Reply with quote
lupercalio
 
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'Finnegans Wake' - The Irish Rovers:  



    Happy St Pats to all!    


_________________
"And that is the most important topic on earth: peace. . . . Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. . . . [but] genuine peace." -- John F. Kennedy, American University Commencement,  Washington DC, June 10 , 1963
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Some Best Bits and Bites from James Joyce's Finnegans Wake
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